If I Had a Raptor

Taken from my review on www.goodreadswithronna.com, where you can find the latest and greatest in children’s literature and educational products.

If I Had a Raptor

Let’s face it, kids love pets: dogs, cats, rabbits, hamsters, even snakes and lizards. But raptors? You’d better believe it! In If I Had a Raptor by George O’Connor, (Candlewick Press, 2014 $15.99; Ages 3-7), a young girl brings home a “teensy and tiny and funny and fluffy” dinosaur. Never mind that the little fluff ball, named Dinah, could grow into a carnivorous beast. Her plucky caregiver showers her with lots of love and attention, and in that oh-so-special kid rationale explains why owning a raptor would be “the best thing ever!”

A baby raptor is so teensy and tiny that she would be easy to lose. I’d give her a little bell so I could always find her. If I had a raptor, she would like to sit on my lap, and I would let her. I might even have to trim her claws a little bit now and then.

The illustrations are fun, and the facial expressions are priceless. Check out Dinah’s face when she’s caught clawing the comfy chair. When our well-meaning pet owner awakens the sleeping dinosaur to play, Dinah’s half-closed eyes and pinched nostrils look incredibly similar to those of an annoyed cat. In fact, this raptor might just be part cat as she likes to “bask on a sunny windowsill or snuggle on clean laundry. She would sleep all day long. She will run around like crazy all night long…she would stalk the little things that catch her eye, like birds, or bugs, or even a dust bunny.”

My young daughter loved seeing Dinah grow from a lap-dinosaur to a full-sized raptor. And she howled with laughter when finicky eater Dinah sniffs at her dino-bowl and puts her snout in the air when she disapproves of the meal.

Whether your child already has a pet or not, he/she will be convinced that a raptor is a great addition to the household.

Fetch! with Ruff Ruffman: Doggie Duties

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Taken from my review on http://www.goodreadswithronna.com, where you can find the latest and greatest in children’s literature and educational products.

Ruff Ruffman is the lovable canine host of the PBS Kids’ show, Fetch! My daughters greatly enjoy watching that educational and fun program. In that vein, Fetch! with Ruff Ruffman: Doggie Duties presents the reader with Ruff’s latest dilemma, a broken toilet. What’s a desperate dog to do?! Too proud to use a litter box, Ruff decides he must learn how to make a space toilet. After all, if NASA can do it, why can’t he?!

Fetch!’s colorful cast of characters, including the feline show supervisor, Blossom, and Ruff’s assistant, the mouse Chet, join Ruff for his adventure. Complete with a science activity on how to clean dirty water with a filter, this book is sure to please and teach.

We Need Diverse Books

The New York Times recently published an article about the lack of diversity in children’s books.

This set off a firestorm in the kidlit and social media spheres. Tumblr is spearheading the current #WeNeedDiverseBooks campaign that’s taking place on its site, as well as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and blogs.

Details can be found here. Essentially, people post photos of themselves or books with the caption “We need diverse books because” and they give a reason. An example is below.

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We need diverse books because everyone has a story to tell.

If this topic is of importance to you, be a part of the conversation!

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Ziggy’s Big Idea

Taken from my review at http://www.goodreadswithronna.com, where you can find the latest and greatest in children’s books and educational products.

I like bagels, especially mixed orange and cranberry, but I don’t know anything about them really.

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Ziggy’s Big Idea by Ilana Long presents one interpretation of the bagel’s origin. Ziggy is an inventive young boy, full of ideas, such as a square ball that doesn’t roll into the street. However, his ideas don’t always work out quite as Ziggy hopes. Just read about Rabbi Levi and the “shulstilts” that Ziggy made so that the Rabbi can “see the congregation over the bimah.” Ziggy’s father works in the bakery. So when the baker’s customers complain that “the buns are undercooked at the center,” Ziggy is determined to help! Will he be of use or just get in the way?

This informative read has additional resources, including a bagel recipe and theories on the bagel’s humble beginnings. It also presents life in a shtetl and uses Yiddish words and phrases. The artwork is full of interesting details, such as storks nesting on chimneys and era décor. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to go get a bagel at my local handy drive-thru bagel shop.

Churchill’s Tale of Tails

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Taken from my review at http://www.goodreadswithronna.com, where you can find the latest and greatest in children’s books and educational products.

Churchill’s Tale of Tails by Anca Sandu is reviewed by Rita Zobayan.

In Churchill’s Tale of Tails, a new picture book by Anca Sandu (Peachtree Publishers, 2014; $16.95; ages 4-8) readers meet Churchill, a rather sophisticated pig. He likes to take tea, paint self portraits (lots of them,) and play classical music. He is also quite a proud pig, especially of his tail. It wasn’t a big tail. It wasn’t a fancy tail. It wasn’t even a very practical tail. But it was his tail, and it made him feel great.

So when Churchill loses his tail, he isn’t happy. His friends, Billy and Gruff, try to help by finding other tails for Churchill to try. There are so many tails—zebra, peacock, fish, and more—and they make him feel so different and wonderful that Churchill no longer has time for his friends. A tail from the fish made Churchill feel fantastic! He could do things he’d never done before. “Churchill never talks to us anymore. It’s all these fancy tails.”

Will Churchill realize he’s being a bad friend? Will he find his own tail? Does he even want it back? This delightful tale will engage readers for the creativity of the story, the humorous artwork, and the moral. Does trying to be different mean that you forget your true friends? Anca Sandu answers this question in a realistic and sweet manner that young children will enjoy and understand.