Reilly’s Life on Kickstarter

Please join our Kickstarter campaign!

Reilly’s Life is an animated series aimed at children who have autism. The show will provide a forum that demonstrates to autistic children, their families, caregivers, practitioners and general audiences that they are not alone in this world and society values and appreciates their experience as autistic individuals. It is a tool in the acceptance and awareness of autistic behaviors that we hope will help society embrace autism as a rich and diverse way of living in this world. It shows some of the challenges faced by children with autism and possible solutions that may help, or at least facilitate a basic understanding of the challenges faced by Reilly.

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Reilly’s Life is created by Sinead Clancy. She is mother to a ten-year-old son with autism. After the initial diagnosis she followed the usual path of blame, anger, fear and looked for the elusive “cure.” But quickly she realized that autism was as much a part of her son as breathing and she now embraces his autistic way of being. Finding a path for him where he could co-exist in a world where autism and autistic identity is not embraced or fully understood sowed the seeds for Reilly’s Life.

Each episode will be 10 minutes of 2D animation followed by a live action bumper that shows children or adults experiencing the unique strengths and challenges of autism in the context of the episode. The show highlights the breadth and depth of autistic life while dealing with some of the common challenges and barriers children with autism face.

 The name is pulled from Sinead’s Irish roots. Someone who is enjoying life to the fullest with no worries is said to have “the life of Reilly.”

Found by Salina Yoon

My review at Good Reads with Ronna, where you can find the latest and greatest in children’s literature.

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Salina Yoon has created a wonderful story with Found (Walker Books for Young Readers /Bloomsbury 2014; $14.99, Ages 2-6.) Bear finds a toy bunny in the forest and wants to find its owner, so he posts “found” flyers in the forest. Time passes and no one claims the bunny, and Bear becomes attached to it. It is, after all, “the most special thing he had ever seen.” But eventually Moose, the owner, spots Floppy, and Bear must prepare to part with his new, treasured toy. I won’t give away the ending, but I will say that it has just the right touch.

The magic of this picture book is its simplicity. The storyline is straightforward and the words are chosen perfectly for the young audience. My kindergartener greatly enjoys Found, and is transported into Bear’s world. When Moose arrives to claim Floppy, my little one’s thumb goes right in her mouth (nervous trait), and when Bear sheds a tear at the thought of parting with Floppy, my little one’s eyes well up, too. Children understand simple, pure emotion and Found presents that to them through the themes of friendship, sacrifice, and love.

The artwork is colorful and appealing. The characters are just adorable. Parents will appreciate the clever play on words and the cultural and historical references on the “lost” flyers. My favorites are “Lost Seasons 1-6,” Peter Pan’s “Lost shadow,” and “Lost my marbles! HELP!”

Your child will get lost in the world of Found, and that’s a good thing.

National Poetry Day

In honor of National Poetry Day, I’m reposting “Poems for Made up Occasions.”  Enjoy!

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With National Poetry Month wrapping up, I’d like to highlight some of my favorite poems and the occasions best suited for them.

Enjoy!

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If you are feeling stressed and need perspective, find solace in The Peace of Wild Things by Wendell Berry.

If you want express your love to your significant other, but are too broke to buy a gift, check out I Am Offering This Poem by Jimmy Santiago Baca.

If you’re tired of the know-it-all in your life, pass along The Book of Wisdom by Stephen Crane for a little passive-aggressive fun.

If you embrace womanhood in all its glory, celebrate with Phenomenal Woman by Maya Angelou. In fact, read anything by Maya Angelou! She is an incredible poet and writer and orator and person. The list goes on!

If people are giving you crap, meditate upon Be Kind Anyway attributed to Mother Teresa (not really a poem, but very inspirational).

If you enjoy the quiet of the morning, find peace with Before Dawn by Jack Cooper.

If you admire cats and/or like misty weather, read Fog by Carl Sandburg.

If you can identify with the folly of youth, pay attention to We Real Cool by Gwendolyn Brooks.

If you think you’ve got it tough, reflect upon Mother to Son by Langston Hughes, and then call your mom.

If you participate in the creation versus evolution debate, think about Design by Robert Frost.

If you have an appreciation for or would like to learn more about Native American beliefs, read Eagle Poem by Joy Harjo.

If you rally for curves, be proud and enjoy Homage to My Hips by Lucille Clifton.

If you can identify with eccentric souls, try a little Tia Chucha by Luis Rodriguez on for size.

If you understand that trees are symbolic of life, read This Tree, This Poem by Luis Rodriguez, and then go hug a tree.

If you have a favorite poem (and an occasion for it), let me know.

There Is Good in This World

Today is remembered for terrible, awful, tragic events. It’s also a day that people everywhere felt the loss and sent out messages of hope, support, love, and sympathy.

To honor 9/11 and to remind ourselves, and especially children, that good is still the predominant force in this world, here is a book that focuses on good people.Good People Everywhere

Taken from my review at Good Reads with Ronna, where you can find reviews on great children’s literature.

Within reading three pages of Good People Everywhere, I’d fallen in love with it. Written by Lynea Gillen and illustrated by Kristine Swarner, this beautiful, touching book is inspiring and empowering. Its message is simple: there are good people doing good things everywhere, every day and in many ways. In a world where we too often hear of the destructive, unethical and terrible acts that people commit, Good People Everywhere offers a powerful juxtaposition to the idea that there are bad people everywhere. It presents the notion that people, including young children, can and do good in the world.

The prose is written in plain language and provides examples that children will find familiar. Numerous examples show children of various ages engaging in good deeds, the kinds that are readily managed by youngsters.

Teachers are teaching math, spelling and reading skills,/Today, people are planning seeds, picking fruits and vegetables, and driving them to grocery stores all around the world, so you can have a ripe, juicy orange in your lunch./Today, a first grade boy is helping a friend who has a skinned knee, and a big sister is holding her baby brother.

The illustrations are warm and engaging, and depict the text in a childlike fashion. They are a perfect complement to the heartfelt message. The bonus activities help children recognize and celebrate the good people around them.

As a mother, I have shared this book with my daughters and discussed how people we know do good things and how they, even at their young ages, can bring good into the world. As an educator, I plan on sharing this uplifting book with my students as our school continues with its theme for the year of giving back. Good People Everywhere provides examples, inspiration and comfort not only to young children